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for religion and edge ikz news weekly is brute to you by a family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individl and group retirement products. that's why we're retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. pope benedict xvi stunned the world this week with the surprise announcement that he's decided to resign, the first pope to step down in 600 years. our coverage today includes analysis from two experts on the church, and it begins with reacti from catholics and non-catholics alie, gathered by our managing editor kim lawton. >> benedict said he's resigning "for the good of the church." >> isn't that a profound sign of his own humility in that he was able to recognize when, you know, it just was more than he could handle? and instead of letting just sort of others do the job, he viewed very strongly that we needed somebody in that position that would really be able to tak
to dianetics then he invented the religion scientology. what is it exactly? there is a lot to know about of very eccentric world view and there are many elements in scientology that soundalike science fiction because there were written by someone gave britain something similar. that you are an immortal soul. in you have lived before and you will live again scientology helps you to remember the past lifetime it is good news to a lot of people. it is called auditing. the auditor between you and your auditor there is a divide called the of e-meter would hold toucans they used to be campbell's soup there is a wire and a small, not of electricity passing through it is one-third of all lie detector the measure is your skin responses not pulsar restoration but it does do something. when you're talking to your auditor the needle is constantly registering. in scientology they think it measures the mass of your thoughts and you can see the movement with the old the painful memory to show up and if you go through this thought and traded of painful qualities then the nato will slow down and pretty s
in extreme poverty. their lives governed by religion and caste. many women never even report an assault, due to the social stigma. we are looking for the woman that the minister is accused of raping. "how do i know" says a neighbor. against a wall of silence. they seem almost too scared to tell us where she is. one person asks who will save them if they go against the establishment. >> these charges. an attempt to murder. >> this man says he tried to go against the establishment. he accused his local minister of trying to kill him after he challenged him in an election. he says this shows this. >> i am a conman. he was a politician. the police never would have had a case against him. >> but there has been no movement in the case so far, like so many in the overloaded indian justice system. we are on our way now to the minister accused of trying to kill his rival. it is not just attempted murder he is charged with, but many other crimes, too, including robbery and kidnapping. this man has won four elections here, and he has been in power 15 years. we pay him a surprise visit and five him surr
disputes, war, religion and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book. my books of the most practical value to our daily lives, and as a shameless author i hope they can be my best purchase book. it's about what i've learned about spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies over the past 50 years. and it's about what friends and other scholars have learned from other tribal societies around the world. all of us here are accustomed to living in big industrial societies, in permanent housing with governments to make decision, with writing and books and internet. where most people live past age 60, when we regulate and counter strangers just as i am encountering you this evening, and where most of our food is grown by older people, we forget that every one of those things a rosary recently in history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution, about 6 million years. but all of the things i just mentioned didn't exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they rose only within the last 11,000 years, and some of them such as the i
not mean this to be in any way disrespectful toward religion-- but is it like a political convention? do you have people getting together feeling each other out? because one of you is going to be elected to this job. what's it like inside one of those conclaves? >> well, before the conclave actually start, there are a number of days when all the cardinals come together so that we can actually talk among ourselves, begin to get a better sense of one another. there are going to be 117 of us there with the right to vote. and just to get to know a little bit better personally one another, there will be four or five days of these meetings. but it-- >> schieffer: will you in any way-- could you be the nominee? >> no, that-- that enters into the world of fantasy. but when we get back into the real world, i think what will happen is a number of cardinals will begin to surface in the conversation among all of us as particularly appealing candidates. it's not like a political process, though. there aren't nominations, and you don't have people saying, "i vote for..." and "my favorite son is..." wh
the campaign cling to their guns and religion. >> oddly enough opposite of 40 years ago. you listen to richard nixon on secret tapes he's saying things i'm for gun control and the way i will do it, scare all of the white voters about the black panthers. chris: and it worked. safe streets act. >> i think there's a mismatch with how people actually live and how people actually want to think about the country. if you look at the border for instance, look at brooklyn and what happened during hurricane sandy, there wasn't any rash of looting and rash of stealing. i don't know if this is going to work. wayne lapierre. chris: i have not seen a republican stand up and say i disagree with wayne lapierre in the media. >> there are two issues here. we will not get a sweeping gun control bill because politics are such we're not. but the question of can wayne lapierre help republicans build a big collision across issues. there i agree with mia i don't that i will happen. i think that's older america. really -- chris: you're smart but could it be short road strategy? everyone know there's a small window bec
. but on other hand he's been a blessing. he reminds world reason always needs to be applied to religion and you can never take up the sword or the bomb in our modern world in the name of religion. both of those come from his scholarship. >> here in the bay area issues that we often associate with the catholic church and the catholics discuss gay marriage, women in the priesthood, child abuse by the clergy are sort of preeminent. do you think that is going to be reflected in this conclave or what are their priorities? >> certainly all those things. as i said, when they get together to talk about what are the pressing issues, all of those things are going to ob their minds. there's a clear direction forward for greater transparency, complete transparency in the church working with the state, with respect to sexual abuse in the church. for those other issues, those changes in the order, in social -- [indiscernible] -- church leadership is a spokesperson for the rest of the church. they listen for the sense of the faithful and they make no major changes
much that can be laid at the pope's feet? >> the purpose of a religion is to help people make sense of the big questions, the questions that none of us have answers to. why are we here, where are we going, why do we suffer, what happens after death. it's important a church or any religion engage with its people and meet them where they are. it's to help people find meaning. when a religion stops helping people find meaning people will turn to consumerism, to culture, and the pope is so busy declaring our culture, the culture of death, you know, putting the responsibility on us. >> you are laying this on the pope's feet. you're saying this person that comes out of cdf and the person who was the chief theologian is alienating the flock in the u.s. and europe where church membership as decline. >> he and the hierarchy of a. they have denied the crisis in the priesthood. >> i think it's doctrinal declarations are beautiful. they are out of time. it's precisely the crisis we haven't addressed. i was with some priests at dinner the other night teaching at a catholic university, living in
about religion and politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, carefully reasoned and fought out, grounded in some deeper attitudes and deeper values and deeper life experiences, what i call world use that really shape or more specific beliefs, both in religion and in politics. so, not going to do too much of this, but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this book to make an elaborate case where every single thing that i say, what i am trying to do is paint a broad landscape of what is wrong with in this country the walleye the population and congress's polarized and why that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called the essentials chart for understanding, you know, the consequences that our budget conundrum are causing. what it shows is as of may 2011, this is done by the center for budget policy and priority based on cbo numbers. this shows the price of the annual deficit due to the board -- wars, the bush-era tax cuts to recovery measures. that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama's stimulus pro
books about the revenge of god, that religion is making a comeback as a political player. two-thirds of the 1.2 billion catholics in the world today live outside the west, and most live in societies where religion is critically important, so, yeah, i would say there's still some gas left in the church's political gas tank. >> john, real quickly, only a couple of seconds left here, but what do you know specifically in regards to what they are looking for for a pope? stances on abortion, same-sex marriage, that kind of thing. >> reporter: well, all these cardinals have been appointed by john paul and benedict so they are all in agreement on the main. of course they are looking for a hole guy but three things quickly, one, somebody with a global vision, two, somebody who is a missionary, who can take the church's message to the street and, three, somebody who can fix the perceived internal governance problems in the vatican itself. you roll all that up, you probably have a pope. >> john allen, so good to get your insight. thank you so much for being with us today. >> sure. >> and
's a pretty progressive sydney and i didn't study business. i studied philosophy and religion and world literature and history and pretty much inanities. when i started the business side of background in economics or business or anything, but i knew i was going to have really low prices would be a different kind of business because it wasn't going to be like those other businesses. once you get into the real world companies got to pay her bills and you're undercapitalized. your philosophy of business can evolve. is interesting because a lot of my friends saw me as a traitor that i gone over to the dark side. and you come in business was struggling. they manage to lose 50% of capital the first year. start with $45,000 every day, micro-finance a time and were only making $200 a month each, way below minimum wage even back then. so i just began to move away from that philosophy. as i was trying to figure business, i read hundreds of business books. to try to understand how to make the business successful. at the same time, somehow i stumbled on to keep all and george gilder and dozens and
about religion and politics, and how so many of the views that we believe are carefully roped -- reasoned and thought out, are grounded in deeper attitudes, deeper values, deeper life experience-what i call world views, that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. so, i'm not going to do too much of this but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this back to make an elaborate case for everything i say. i try paint a blood landscape why the population and congress is for alreadyized and why that it that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called sort of the essential chart for understanding the consequences that our budget conundrum. it shows in may 2011 -- doesn't by the senate for budget policies and priorities based on cbo numbers. this shows the parts of the annual deficits that are due to the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures -- that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama stimulus programs -- t.a.r.p., fannie and freddie, and the economic
of religions. >> guest: i would woo say at it more complex. i find these a clash of civilize and other concept related to this rather simplistic, and by now, ten years -- more than ten years after 9/11, we should be aware of the complexity of what is happening on the ground abroad where america is involved in various wars. i final that many of these conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before 9/11 between central government and the tribes and communities on their borders, on the areas between states. so, therefore, without an understanding of local culture or history, it's impossible to implosion immiss stick notions. i know we here in the united states sigh this as a class of civilization but talk to one? iran or yemen and they will just look aghast at the concept there's a clash of civilizations. 90% of the survey had no idea what 9/11 was or who osama bin laden was. so, of there, we have to be very careful of how we are analyzing the contemporary world, and i maintain there's a crisis already existing in those parts of the world that the united states has now drifted into
be applied to religion. >> here in the bay area, issues that we often are associated with the catholic church and the catholics discuss, gay marriage, women in the priesthood, child abuse by the clergy are sort of preimminent. do you think that will be reflected in the conclave? what are their priority in the. >> certainly all those things will be on their minds. there is a clear direction forward for greater transparency, complete transparency in the church and working with the states with respect to sexual abuse in the church. for the other issues, the changes in the order and social issues of the church, church leadership is the spokes person for the rest of the church. they listen to the faithful and make no major changes that they see in way would scandal them. >> it will be interesting. the catholic church is one of the oldest political institutions in the western world. >> and speaking of politics -- >>> the latest punchline on the colbert report in the state of california. >> obviously i don't trust the state completely because off bear on your flag! >> california's lieutenant g
. the campus club was formed a year ago. ignite member, danny phan, says the events main focus was not religion, but about different forms of love. "we feel valentines day has really been cheapened. love is kind of superficial but we're here to spread positivity and a different kind of love." performer saylah, hopes those viewing and passing by the event received his, as well as ignites message about love. " "just by showing them no matter what, they don't need to do anything. god loves them. we love them. i want to stand for something. i felt it had a great purpose." young hopes that those who came to the event received the organizations message. "i just pray for encounters today. as we play music, as we have different performers go up and speakers, people would have opened their ears to hear." standup - students who want more information about ignite can go to their website at igniterolcc.com. live on campus this is saushe young, update news." many people are no doubt still caught up in the afterglow of valentines day, and here on campus students were able to express their affection for the p
that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
religions, actual religions and i think that, look, there's ways that people can take days off for their special days. i think though that you're going to be looked at funny if you insist you need halloween off. i think it's insulting if you're a wiccan or a pagans and if you're an atheist or a pagans, if you're celebrating nature, an everyday experience. >> tucker: only a country too rich too long could be this frivolous and silly. the statements from the school, the information about the wiccan and pagans holidays, the statement says, has been in the guide since last fall. keep in mind this is not intended just for faculty, this is an informational guide for anyone across campus. letting you know. >> letting you know which days you can take. >> tucker: and christianity and comes down to-- >> i think that there's a rejection of tradition. i think this is again, not about elevating anyone else, it's about paganses and wiccans used for a political agenda to downgrade what's important to a majority of americans. i think that this is an anti-tradition action. i think paganses and
in the rye." and, of course, there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliot's four quartets. and we learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, open-eyed and laughing to the tomb. and i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. it's in a greek anthology translation by dudley fitz, wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in harbor, tomorrow, i said, and death spoke in that little word. o stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marveled at keats' ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across a smooth table. we hungered for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. and if we were going to be saved, we knew it would be by literature. and it was the french historian jules membership lay who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn to biography, to life writing. history, he said -- and you could think that he meant to include biography and fiction -- history, he
that in the industrialized world there is it a lot of people who don't stee the relevance of the religion and he wants to reenergize that faith. he started the uro faith . amms wrote a book evangelical of catholicism and calling for the church to deepen people's faith. janet? >> all right. thank you very much for the update. can you tell us about what comes next in the process? this pope had specific outreach, but what about the next one. you mentioned there may be interest in focusing on somebody to represent the different geoh, graphy. the process seems so secretive. >> i tomit give you ideas who may be in the top. it is important to understand the selection by what the church needs. if you go to the criteria and the church needs to reenergize. cardinal ravizi for culture. he's also the president of a different pontiffical commissions. he's leading the papal lenten retreat it is an honor to lead that retreat. two others had had . both went on to be the pope . cardinal schoola who is italian branch. they make up 25 percent of the cardinals and they center a big voting block . you can see cardinal ole
you go with -- >> as long as we're in the fantasy religion league, i won't with -- i went with soemtier. it would be to be a woman in america, that's not going to happen, but it does speak to some of the issues about how the church needs to open itself up and find herself, puerto rican, grew up in the bronx, has mixed it up in the real world and would be a good thing for whoever is pope. >> angela, who did you come up with? >> not yourself. >> absolutely not. but i think it's important to note there's 150 million catholics in africa and there is a quote that the pope said. he considers africa to be the spiritual lungs of humanity. to that end i seconded cardinal peter turkson who was recently appointed by the pope to head the pontifical council for justice and peace. he is a notable leader, and he is also from ghana. >> pope peter. >> yes, pope peter. >> that's got a nice ring to it, robert costa. >> the new millennium. i think that's a great pick. we'll hear a lot about third world choices, someone outside of italy, maybe outside of europe. if it's not going to be an amer
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)